there’s no fool like an old fool

1546 J. HEYWOOD Dialogue of Proverbs II. ii. F4v But there is no foole to the olde foole, folke saie.

1721 J. KELLY Scottish Proverbs 256 No fool to an old Fool. Spoken when Men of advanc’d Age behave themselves, or talk youthfully, or wantonly.

1732 T. FULLER Gnomologia no. 3570 No Fool like the old Fool.

1814 SCOTT Waverley III. xv. And troth he might hae ta’en warning, but there’s nae fule like an ould fule.

1910 R. KIPLING Rewards & Fairies 257 ‘There are those who have years without knowledge.’ ‘Right,’ said Puck. ‘No fool like an old fool.’

2001 Washington Post 8 July B5 But these fantasies are more proper to a young person; beyond the age of, say, 50, they become the fantasy of that fool like whom we are told there is no other, the old fool.


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  • there's no fool like an old fool — ► there s no fool like an old fool proverb the foolish behaviour of an older person seems especially foolish as they are expected to think and act more sensibly than a younger one. Main Entry: ↑fool …   English terms dictionary

  • there's no fool like an old fool — When an older person behaves foolishly, it seems worse than when a younger person does the same, especially in relationships, as an older person should  kknow better …   The small dictionary of idiomes

  • (there's) no fool like an old fool — (there s) ˌno fool like an ˈold fool idiom (saying) an older person who behaves in a stupid way is worse than a younger person who does the same thing, because experience should have taught him or her not to do it Main entry: ↑foolidiom …   Useful english dictionary

  • there's no fool like an old fool — proverb the foolish behavior of an older person seems especially foolish as they are expected to think and act more sensibly than a younger one …   Useful english dictionary

  • (Now and Then There's) A Fool Such as I — Single by Hank Snow Released 1952 Format 1952 Writer(s) Bill Trader Ha …   Wikipedia

  • fool — Ⅰ. fool [1] ► NOUN 1) a person who acts unwisely. 2) historical a jester or clown. ► VERB 1) trick or deceive. 2) (fool about/around) act in a joking or frivolous way. 3) …   English terms dictionary

  • Old master print — The Three Crosses, etching by Rembrandt, 1653, State III of IV An old master print is a work of art produced by a printing process within the Western tradition (European or New World). A date of about 1830 is usually taken as marking the end of… …   Wikipedia

  • like — I. verb (liked; liking) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English līcian; akin to Old English gelīc alike Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. chiefly dialect to be suitable or agreeable to < I like onions but they don t like me > 2 …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • fool — see a fool and his money are soon parted a fool at forty is a fool indeed there’s no fool like an old fool a fool may give a wise man counsel children and fools tell the truth fortune favours fools …   Proverbs new dictionary

  • old — see old habits die hard you cannot put an old head on young shoulders old sins cast long shadows old soldiers never die better be an old man’s darling, than a young man’s slave you cannot catch old birds with chaff …   Proverbs new dictionary

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